St George’s Chapel is the place of worship at Windsor Castle in England, United Kingdom. It is both a royal peculiar and the chapel of the Order of the Garter. The chapel is governed by the Dean and Canons of Windsor.

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The Queen’s Free Chapel of the College of St. George, Windsor Castle

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Members of the order meet at Windsor Castle every June for the annual Garter Service. After lunch in the State Apartments in the Upper Ward of the Castle they process on foot, wearing their robes and insignia, down to St George’s Chapel where the service is held. If any new members have been admitted to the Order they are installed at the service. After the service, the members of the order return to the Upper Ward by carriage or car.
Members of the public outside St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle, waiting to watch the Garter Procession

The order once enjoyed frequent services at the chapel, but, after becoming infrequent in the 18th century, were discontinued after 1805. The ceremony was revived in 1948 by King George VI for the 600th anniversary of the founding of the Order, and has since become an annual event.

After their installation, members are each assigned a stall in the chapel choir above which his or her heraldic devices are displayed.

A member’s sword is placed below a helm which is decorated with a mantling and topped by a crest, coronet or crown. Above this, a member’s heraldic banner is flown emblazoned with his or her arms. A much smaller piece of brass („stall plate“) is attached to the back of the stall displaying its member’s name, arms and date of installation.

On a member’s death, the sword, helm, mantling, crest, coronet or crown, and banner are removed. A ceremony marking the death of the late member must be held before the stall can be assigned to anyone else. This ceremony takes place in the chapel, during which the Military Knights of Windsor carry the banner of the deceased member and offer it to the Dean of Windsor, who places it on the altar.

The stall plates, however, are not removed; rather, they remain permanently affixed somewhere about the stall, so the stalls of the chapel are festooned with a colourful record of the members throughout history.

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Peter Carington, 6. Baron Carrington in der Robe des Kanzlers des Hosenbandordens
(Vergleich siehe Bild im Buch)

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